Pushing for Cushing – The Framingham Beat

Published on May 18, 2015

This video is about town historian Fred Wallace discussing his new book, Pushing for Cushing in War and Peace – A History of Cushing Hospital: 1943-1991. You can watch AFTV, in Framingham, on Comcast channel 9, RCN ch3 or Verizon ch43. For the full program check outhttp://tinyurl.com/The-Framingham-Bea…. For more information check out our website at http://www.accessfram.tv

Resources

Framingham’s Town Seal

The Old Academy


Framingham: 1600s – 1700s 

Nipmuck

Thomas Danforth

Sarah Clayes ——

Sarah Towne Clayes (Cloyes)

Origins of the Salem Witch Trials

The Three Towne Sisters

Warrant arrest for Sarah and Peter Cloyes

Spinning and Weaving of Flax and Wool

Hearth

Colonel Thomas Nixon Jr.

Peter Salem

Abel Benson

Transportation & Knox Cannon Trail


Framingham: 1800s

Peter Parker’s teacher desk

Framingham’s First Industry – Straw Bonnets

Colorful Birds from Brazil

Dolls & Doll House

Early Transportation, Worcester Turnpike, B&W Railroad, Trolleys and Bicycles


Framingham: 1900s

Telephone, Television and Milk Delivery

Framingham Heart Study

Women’s Suffrage in Framingham

Christa McAuliffe 


Water Log worksheet

A Dennison Rountable – The Framingham Beat

Published on Mar 16, 2015

This video is about the Framingham History Center giving people a chance to view the recently discovered treasures at the second edition of A Dennison Roundtable series. You can watch AFTV, in Framingham, on Comcast channel 9, RCN ch3 or Verizon ch43. For the full program check out http://tinyurl.com/The-Framingham-Bea…. For more information check out our website at http://www.accessfram.tv

In Memory of Mary…

Contributed by Elsa Hornfischer

December 14, 2014

Years ago, when the Framingham History Center’s Oral History Project began, it was my privilege to volunteer alongside Mary E. Murphy. During the years since and over 100 stories later I had learned many things from this loving teacher, mentor, and friend.

  • Mary was all about stories – both in and out of the Oral History Project…
  • She listened, closely, to the stories around her.
  • She repeated many of them – historical stories, interesting stories, Irish stories, political and educational stories, and stories from her many years of teaching.
  • She lived a most beautiful, committed, kind, attentive, and forward-thinking story of her own, and, by example, showed others how to TRY to do the same.
  • But one of her most impressive and frequent demonstrations was to relay these stories accurately and visually – exposing her clear and impeccable memory in the “telling!” It was Mary, not I most of the time, who remembered just about everything I ever told her or had been written within the pages of a book I once read!

She was a positive life force – always – and seemingly ageless: a very early example of where the accomplishments of America’s women would end up going since the 1950’s. She mentored dozens and dozens of women by her example – in a nutshell, the movement just flowed out of her and up into the community, it seems, just about everywhere. What could we women do but TRY to follow!

Over this past year, I often heard my grandson Jacob speak fondly about one of his very favorite ITN clients – a wonderful lady he drove around town on errands. (His client could no longer drive herself so often called ITN – a Framingham-based non-profit service for those who no longer drive.) Jacob’s client? Her name was Mary E. Murphy. Within one year of their friendship, however, Jacob left to pursue a job as a taxi driver, hoping for more hours.

My very last memory of Mary, only weeks before she passed, was of her almost running through a full capacity crowd in Old Edgell Library.

“Elsa,” she spoke excitedly, “Jacob is back!”

Mary’s spirit, her smile, her memory, her kindness, and her storytelling has passed down to yet another, much, much younger, generation – to my grandson’s – and undoubtedly to grandchildren of her own…

That’s just exactly how a good life plays out – Mary knew that.

Thank you, Mary E. Murphy for all that you were and all that you stood for!